Freshly Roasted Coffee Beans

Does the aroma of freshly roasted coffee beans exert a hypnotic effect on you and entice you to line up at your favourite coffee shop for immediate gratification?

Perhaps you grind your own special roast and make your morning coffee at home? How satisfying that must be!

But is coffee bad for you?

Does your conscience sometimes bother you with thoughts that it may not be so good for your health?

What is wrong with drinking coffee, anyway? Some of the negatives seem to be related to its caffeine content, which

  • Stimulates an elevated stress response, leading to the production of excess cortisol, hence increased inflammation.
  • Decreases insulin sensitivity, therefore leading to high blood sugar levels and cardiovascular disease.
  • Can cause indigestion because of its acidity.
  • Can disrupt sleep and increase anxiety and depression (that 'tired and wired' feeling).
  • Can lead to increased excretion of magnesium, potassium and calcium, all needed for normal body functions.

Coffee nutrition

girl's face in milky froth of a cup of coffeeThe Art of Coffee Making


Nutritionally, coffee's antioxidants, potassium, magnesium, oils and caffeine may be beneficial - depending on many variables.

Bearing in mind that not all beans are equal, for example the caffeine content is less in some varieties, such as Arabica and growing and roasting conditions vary, it is clear that coffee growing and making is, indeed, a mysterious art.

Oils, located near the centre of the bean, have a high melting point and are important in  the roasting and subsequent flavour and aroma of the coffee. The result depends upon the heat, duration and type of roasting employed.


Apparently there are more than a thousand chemicals in coffee. Some of their interactions are bound to be beneficial and some the reverse. Check out the chemistry science here.

Is coffee good for you, then?

Perhaps there's such a thing as healthy coffee consumption. Certainly, much recent research seems indicate that this is so.

Some benefits:

  • Coffee can reduce deposits of calcium in coronary arteries.
  • It stimulates antioxidant production in cells.
  • Possibly protects against Parkinsons and Alzheimers diseases.
  • May reduce the risk of diabetes type 2
  • Lowers the risk of some liver diseases
  • Can help burn fat and enhance physical performance
  • Can improve mood and brain function (not news to you?)

As with most things, moderation seems to be the key. Health benefits of coffee do not extend to added sugar and cream, so stick with black or add a dash of milk.

Coffee Culture - which freshly roasted coffee beans are best?

Surely that's a matter of personal preference, as is the style of coffee that you choose - espresso, cappuchino, latte, flat white, short black, and so on.

Coffee culture had its origins in Turkey in the fourteenth century and spread to Europe, where social gatherings centred around them often shared the purpose of intellectual and artistic discussions.

Coffee drinking in Australia was barely known until after the end of World War 2, when many Italian and Greek migrants introduced coffee shops to the main cities. This pastime soon 'took off', with most cafes or coffee shops across the country, many of them with their own, trained baristas, being independently owned and run to exceptionally high standards.

Coffee maker machines and grinders

Do you have one? Do you love it? Would you be interested in telling us about yours or in writing a review about a few different machines that you have experienced? If so, please submit your article of 400 words + (with photos of those freshly roasted coffee beans as well as the machine in action, if possible) via the form, below. There will be many people interested in what you have to say. Thanks for helping them.

The best coffee maker?

Do you just love your coffee maker? Please tell us why?



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